====================================
LAPIDARY ARTS AND FACETERS DIGEST

a digest committed to carrying on the fine
works started by Hale Sweeny and Jerry Dewbre
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Issue No. 4 - Thursday November 7, 2002
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Click a link below to post to the list:
for faceting questions faceters@caprock-spur.com
for other lapidary questions lapidary@caprock-spur.com
====================================
List Posting Guidelines and rules can be found at:
http://www.facetersdigest.org/rules.htm
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Web Site http://www.facetersdigest.org
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Published Monday thru Friday, except holidays
from deep in the heart of rural Texas
====================================
The Lapidary Arts Digest is moderated by:
Thurmond Moore III & Fred Ward (Gemology)
====================================
From the Moderator:

It has come to my attention that some have labled
me as an "expert in this field". Let me tell you in no
uncertain terms that this is NOT Correct. I have been
faceting about 2 .5 years and cabbing about the same.
I started my first list when Hale Sweeny's Lapidary Digest
ceased distribution so I have about the same amount of time
in list operation as well. This list and others are responsible for
much of the practical knowledge that I now have in lapidary.

My true expertise is in computers and equipment maintenance.
I worked for 18 years in the Semiconductor Industry, A few years
in heating and cooling and the last 5 1/2 years in telecommunications.
(mainly computer repair, all aspects of operating ISP backend,
dial-up and broadband)

There is not much else to say today except we have
a great digest thanks to your post. Keep 'em coming.

Thurmond
====================================
Index to Today's Digest

Lapidary Messages:
--------------
01 Re:Saw Lubricants
02 Re: Louisiana Opal
03 Tile saw blades - another view
04 Re: Slab Saw Oils
05 Re: Saw Blades
06 Gilson opal

Faceting Messages:
--------------
07 Ad- Tourmaline Rough
08 Re: re-cutting stones
09 Re: Microwave treatment
10 Re: re-cutting stones
11 Re: re-cutting stones
12 Ad: Vargas Pol-A-Gem laps
13 Re: Facet Finder
14 RE: re-cutting
15 BIO: Bruce Greenleaf

Business Section:
0 messages
====================================
LAPIDARY DISCUSSION:


Message:01

Subject: Re:Saw Lubricants
Date: Wed, 06 Nov 2002 17:49:23 -0800
To: faceters@caprock-spur.com
From: Don Rogers <Don@Campbell-gemstones.com>

At 07:43 PM 11/6/02 -0600, you wrote:
>Does anyone on the list use a 18" or
>bigger slab saw with nonpetroleum based lubricants? Like the lubricant
>from Johnson Bros

I use the Johnson Bros lube in my 6" trim saw. It leaves a coating for the
lack of a better term on the rocks, my hands, etc. It does seem to extend
my blade life. I drain down the sump and spin dry the blade after every
days use. I never tried it in my 18" saws as I am not a fan of water
based coolants. They don't offer the rust protection of an oil based
one. I'm not sure if blade wear is a problem though. I used to be a
machine repairman at a major auto factory and serviced all of the tool room
machines as well as the cuttoff machines in the steel stock room. My
experience was that the machines that used oil as a coolant, held up better
that the ones using a water based coolant, including water soluble oil. My
theory was that the water separated from coolant and the mist looked for a
nook or area to settle in and cause rust. The machines using the water
based coolant included band saws, abrasive cuttoff (48" wheel), and surface
grinders. Good end of shift cleanup would reduce the rust problems
considerably. As most of us Old Rock hounds are not likely to clean up the
saw every night, draining down the sump, wiping every thing down and
applying an oil spray over all rustable parts, the water based coolant
don't provide the protection needed IMHO.

Don
_______________________________________________________________

Message:02

Subject: Re: Louisiana Opal
Date: Wed, 6 Nov 2002 20:07:58 -0600
To: <faceters@caprock-spur.com>
From: "Criss Morgan" <criss@cox.net>

re- Criss Morgans interesting post on Louisians Opal, I have read
various articles on it in the magazines. My question is since it is a
soft opal imbedded in a harder sand, how do you polish it with the
softer part always wearing down faster than the harder base materiel. In
the same area, ruby in zoeisite would present a similar problem?
RonSteck

Hi Ron,
Actually, the Quartzite sandstone and opal are the same
hardness. Most opal is the same hardness as Quartz, and as such the
Louisiana Opal doesn't present much problem in polishing. Sometimes, you
will get a little undercutting between the grains of sand in the matrix,
especially on a machine that uses diamonds as a cutting agent, but on an old
silicon carbide machine it mostly doesn't happen until you get to the
polishing stage. I use Cerium Oxide to polish the opal with and it seems
like there is no way to keep it from undercutting a tiny bit.
Thurmond, I have tried for years to take a decent photograph of a Louisiana
Opal without success. I guess I'll have to take a lively piece to a
professional photographer and see what he can do with it. When I do, I will
send it to you to post.
Has anyone heard the latest on the "other" list? Write me and I'll send you
something eye opening.
Criss

_______________________________________________________________

Message:03

Subject: Tile saw blades - another view
Date: Wed, 06 Nov 2002 21:08:28 -0500
To: lapidary@caprock-spur.com
From: "denney.wilson" <denney.wilson@worldnet.att.net>

I agree with those who say that the tile and masonary blades are
cheaper and last a long time. However, as the old saying goes, there is
no free lunch. The price that is paid is in the kerf width. Most
non-lapidary saws cut a kerf that is at least 3x and sometimes 10x wider
than the best lapidary saws. With cheap or inexpensive rough (some
low-end agates, some aventurines, or rough cobbing of some low end facet
material), this is not an issue. Indeed, in those cases, I always use
the cheaper blades! However, when cutting rare or valuable material, it
only makes sense to use the finest kerf available, unless you are rich.


_______________________________________________________________

Message:04

Subject: Slab Saw Oils
Date: Wed, 06 Nov 2002 21:28:40 -0500
To: lapidary@caprock-spur.com
From: John <john@kentuckyagate.net>

I have been reading all the messages lately on oils and I have been using
Almag for over 15 years and I put some doubled 5 lb brown bags in my saws
on the shelve where slabs fall after they are cut. I fill the bags up to
about 2/3's full of sludge and within 12 hours I get more than 50% of the
oil back and cleaned. You can take the 5 gal pails that the oil comes in
and put a few pieces of brick or wood in the bottom and place the bags on
top of them and in a few more days you will get back alot more cleaned oil.
back.

_______________________________________________________________

Message:05

Subject: Re: Saw Blades
Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2002 09:37:57
To: lapidary@caprock-spur.com
From: "Gems of the Earth" <goe6@attbi.com>

"In 2 years of cutting I have almost wore out
1 saw blade. Most of my sawing is agates and jaspers." WOW - what a
blade! Do you mind telling us what brand and type of saw blade this is
that lasts that long? Lenny

_______________________________________________________________

Message:06

Subject: Gilson opal
Date: Wed, 06 Nov 2002 22:14:19 -0800
To: lapidary@caprock-spur.com
From: "Connie" <mollie2dot@qwest.net>

Hi, if any of you are cabbing Gilson opal and have leftover shards,
nubbins and random unusable pieces, I am interested in purchasing them.
I have started blowing glass and the Gilson opal is compatable with the
borosilicate glass I'm using. I'm looking to experiment without
investing a bundle. Thanks, Connie <mollie2dot@qwest.net>

_______________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________
FACETING DISCUSSION:

Message:07

Subject: FS- Tourmaline Rough
Date: Wed, 6 Nov 2002 21:35:00 EST
To: faceters@caprock-spur.com
From: Elpaninaro@aol.com

Evening everyone,

Thanks to all again for your many thoughtful comments here and in private
email to date. I am definitely gonna go Facetron now :)

Sorry to make a commercial post so new to the group, but as I told a member
in an email exchange we have been having, last week I went to storage and did
some digging whereupon I found a nice stash of tourmaline rough I did not
know I had! It would take me years to cut all of this so...

I have decided the best way to help finance buying a faceting machine is to
sell some of this material and wanted to offer it here. I do not have a carat
scale on hand, so would like to see what interest level there is and then I
can weigh pieces at a local jeweler or something and send pics over the
weekend to interested parties.

Most of this material is 2 carats to 3 grams in weight by my estimation and
any flaws will be reported. Here is what I had in mind price-wise,

Indicolite- clean crystal sections with good blue a/b and electric blue open
c-axis- first rate material in my limited experience, $20 per gram
Indicolite- one two gram crystal with deep blue color and closed c, $15 per
gram
Indicolite- clean crystal sections with greenish color and or closed c-axis,
$10 per gram
Rubellite- clean hot pink c-axis pieces, one with yellow ab axis, $15 per
gram
Green- a few pieces, one verdelite and two borderline chromites with wild
blue hues, $15 per gram
Paraiba- one outstanding crystal section tourmaline with a very vibrant blue
green color, probably 1.5 grams or so and flawless it is in natural state and
a near preform for a pear with good recovery, $35 per gram.
A few other odds and ends too- mostly Rhodolite

Just to make it clear too, all items are first come first served and I am
happy to take returns with no questions asked. Just looking to raise some
faceting machine money and if you do not like the rough you can send it right
on back for a refund.

Thanks everyone!

Tom.

_______________________________________________________________

Message:08

Subject: re: re-cutting stones.
Date: Wed, 6 Nov 2002 22:30:56 -0500
To: <faceters@caprock-spur.com>
From: "Rich" <richtherm@bluemarble.net>

Hello Rockey (and list),

I go about recutting in two different ways. One is when cutting for an
individual that wants the stone to look exactly (or a close match) to
the original because of sentimental value and the other for putting
"correct" angles on a poorly cut stone. To me, re-cutting poor stones
from over seas is the easiest.

Before I start, I have to tell you, I'm not a pro and self taught. If
there is anybody out there that does it for a living, you should
probably listen to them first. And, If I'm wrong, tell me, I can use
all the help I can get :-)

First, check the depth of the stone. If a stone has a window, more than
likely the pavilion is going to be too shallow to keep the width of the
stone. The rule of thumb I use is the total depth
(Crown+girdle+Pavilion) should be around 65-70% of the width (or length
which ever one is greater). I'm sure there are calcs to get the exact
numbers, but this is how I estimate all rough to quickly figure out what
size of stone I am going to get. I don't mind carrying a calculator to
shows to figure this out. A peace of rough that is 6 mm thick should
return a stone somewhere in the 9mm range (if inclusions, stone width
etc cooporate that is). To get a deeper pavilion, you are going to
have to gain depth by getting a wider girdle first (watch the dop size
you use, a dop that is just right for a stone 8mm wide will probably
come way too close to the lap by the time you gain 2mm and have a 6mm
wide stone). Do trial cuts at the break angles then drop in your mains
and polish. After this, transfer and cut the crown as normal.
Basically, it is a total recut, you just get the same stone in a smaller
version. I started out by trying find the angles that the stone was
originally cut at, but it becomes so time consuming that I should have
went ahead and bought rough stones instead.

Re-cuts for individuals is a pain, but rewarding experience. Good thing
is, normally you only have to hit the crown. The person that wants the
stone cut basically just wants it to look like it did when they or a
loved one bought it (no chips, dips or errors I guess you could say).
If you are lucky, all you have to do is polish the crown (or even the
table and stars) of the stone, but if there are chips, a 3K lap and a
lot of attention may be necessary. Normal wear shows up on the table
and star/break meets, so these are the points you would more than likely
have to hit. Watch the girdle, if it gets too thin (if you had to go to
the breaks and mains), hit it with a 3K to get an acceptable girdle
thickness and polish. A girdle that is knife edged may lead to breaking
the stone when resetting it.

If a stone comes in from someone that has sentimental attachment and it
is windowed, it is probably better to leave it as is and just knock out
the imperfections. Why? I redid a 1.5 C emerald for a lady and was
tickled pink with the way it came out. The lady wasn't too happy at all
because it didn't look like the same stone (flashier). Also be careful
about taking off width or length to get the right angles, it might not
fit in the setting it came out of. Again, not a happy customer.

Another thing I have found is know the stone before starting. Use
refractal or equiv to look for cracks that abrasions/chips may be
hiding. Study it good, and get a signature on what the customer says
the stone is. I once started to re-cut a 1.8 C emerald for a store that
had been turned over to them as synthetic. It was so abraded that you
couldn't see anything inside it. After polishing about the table and
half the facets , I notice it had inclusions in it. I finished the
stone, but with a lot of sweat on my brow and a big lesson learned: you
can see through the pavilion also.

Sorry I went on so long, and I hope I was able to help,

Rich Ashcraft
Lyons, IN
richtherm@bluemarble.net
_______________________________________________________________

Message:09

Subject: Re: Issue No. 3 - Wednesday November 6, 2002
Date: Thu, 07 Nov 2002 00:19:51 -0700
To: faceters@caprock-spur.com
From: John McLaughlin <jemstone@amug.org>

I'm not sure why that worked Mike. The stone and flower had little to no moisture and I
thought the heat generated in a microwave comes from molecules of water becoming agitated
by the microwave bombardment. Is the topaz irradiated by the microwave? But then, why
would the bowl crack?

> I used my Microwave and a bowl of flower. I put a cut topaz oval in the middle of a
> pottery bowl of flower and heated for 1 1/2 minuets on Hi power. The stone turned
> golden yellow.

John McLaughlin
Glendale, Arizona

_______________________________________________________________

Message:10

Subject: Recutting
Date: Thu, 07 Nov 2002 16:54:02 +0000
To: faceters@caprock-spur.com
From: "Michael Edgett" <chicket@msn.com>

Rocky,
In regards to your question about recutting "native" or poorly cut stones
this is how I do it.
1. Regrind the existing table with a 1200 lap to provide a good bonding
surface and then superglue to the largest dop that will fit the
table, (allowing for a narrower width on the finished stone).
2. Recut and polish the existing pavilion using the lowest angles
feasible for that particular species of stone. The object is to cut
the least amount of material necessary to get the proper angles and
not lose any depth. Generally the stones that I recut, (ruby,
sapphire, emerald), are cut shallow and I will end up with a narrower
oval shape as this retains the greatest weight. If you are recutting
topaz or quartz and they are large, then retaining weight is not so
critical.
3. Finish the crown in a normal fashion.
A lot of the recuts that I do are crown only and are designed as a
"re-polish". In this case I just recut and polish the crown at lower angles,
(leaving the girdle alone).
The last recut that I did involved taking an 8x6 oval yellow sapphire that I
purchased on E-bay and cutting it into a 7.7x5.6 pear shape to fit into a
customers existing mounting. The final size was dictated by the depth of the
stone, (using 39 degree mains). Even at this low angle the stone looked very
nice.

Mike E.

_______________________________________________________________

Message:11

Subject: Re-cutting
Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2002 11:38:41 -0800 (PST)
To: IFA Faceters Digest <faceters@caprock-spur.com>
From: Glenn Klein <glennklein@yahoo.com>

Hi Rockey and All:

Rockey Starnes asked for comments about re-cutting his
windowed stones. I am surprised that nobody said anything
about this.

For what it is worth, my advice would be to determine
the gemstone species that you will be working with. Then
simply use that species on the list of gem materials to
find out what the refractive index and critical angle is
for that material. If you have a copy of Glenn Vargas'
Faceting for Amateurs, you find a nice Graph on page 79 of
a 1989 edition or on page 81 of the 1969 edition.

Be sure to cut the culet (closing) facets on your stone at
two or three degrees above the culet angle. The windowed
stones already are below the culet angle...that is why you
can see through the gem. This is so important on the
pavilion, to cut the culet facets above the critical angle.
As far as the crown goes, you can use many angles, but
should stay close as possible to what Glenn Vargas' advises
for that material. Glenn Vargas' advice is just as
important today as it was thirty years ago...regardless of
what the new boys say!

You must realize that your finished stone is going to be
much smaller than it once was. But that is what has to
happen for you to be happy with the end results.

I remember a large aquamarine that I had that weighed in at
about forty carats. It was a native cut aqua from Brazil,
probably cut with a jam-peg machine. That cutter tried to
save as much weight as possible, but the stone was not
pretty because of the windowing. I decided to re-cut the
monster, but when I got into it, I found that I was loosing
a great deal of material. I began to fudge, and cut the
pavilion much nearer to the proper culet angles, but not
quite there yet. When I got through, the gem had lost
about six or seven carats and still could be seen through
on the very bottom, rather large, culet facets. I quit
with the expensive material as it was, and had it mounted
for my wife as a pendant. She wore it only once. It did
not have near the sparkle and interest that my other stones
had, which were cut to proper angles.

The end advice is that you will have to decide how much you
are willing to give up. If it is expensive rough, you will
just have to absorb the loss of weight. However, you will
end up with a much prettier stone.

Glenn Klein
Lake Forest, CA USA
Faceters Symposium 2003

_______________________________________________________________

Message:12

Subject: Advertisement
Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2002 14:01:23 EST
To: faceters@caprock-spur.com
From: GEMARTSERV@aol.com

Facet polishing laps
Still have a couple of dozen Vargas Pol-A-Gem laps left. Only Cerium Oxide
in 6" size. There will be no more 8". Glenn really is not interested in
fiddling with his lathe to correct his maching problems at 8". He and his
protoge, Dick Rugel, will make more 6" if there is demand. There is nothing
faster,better or more durable than a Pol-A-Gem for quartz,sunstone, opal etc.
One lap should last a lifetime ....and they DO NOT SCRATCH. They also work
great on 8" machines. Lemme know your interest. Price delivered in US is
$63.85.
Jerry Newman Gemart Services gemartserv@aol.com

_______________________________________________________________

Message:13


Subject: Facet Finder
Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2002 16:40:23 -0500 (EST)
To: faceters@caprock-spur.com
From: vloakhl@webtv.net (Vincent Bishop,OD)

To Rocky, who inquired in yesterday's digest, and other faceters who
may not be familiar with the "Mirror Facet Finder" I submit the
following post:

There is an old trick used by machinists for many years to align
parallel surfaces.It has been presented to the lapidary as a facet
finder, a means to check facet flatness and numerous other titles. It
consists of a one-inch square, 1/4-inch thick piece of PLATE glass
mirror. Any mirror glass shop that makes custom-sized mirrors will sell
pieces of scrap PLATE glass (or even give you some scrap). Plate glass,
I have been told, is ground and polished and is much closer to an
optical flat than thinner molded mirrors. The procedure is simple:
l. Place a 40-watt (FROSTED bulb) lamp of adjustable height in back of
the faceting machine,(old-fashioned gooseneck lamp is ideal).
2. Place the mirror on the lap positioned so you see the bulb image.
3. Lower the spindle with dopped stone down to the mirror surface in the
center of the bulb image.
4. The light, the mirror on the lap, and the observer's eye must all be
aligned. The observer's eye should be moved back and forth slightly to
achieve this alignment. Once the technique is mastered, the whole set-up
and observation takes about 30 sec., and "Newton's Rings" are reflected
in the mirror.
If the facet is not polished, a minute drop of water between the stone
and mirror surface will show a "black-out" pattern of the contact area.
If the facet is semi-polished, no water is required. This colored
ring-pattern is actually light interference lines and indicates the true
flatness of the facet, its high/low portions, where such portions are
located on the facet and what machine adjustments (if any) are needed.
The great advantage is that all adjustments can be made before any
additional grinding/polishing and removal of additional material is
done. Some faceters paint the facet with an aluminum scribe and pass the
facet over the lap to see where marking are removed; the mirror method
avoids additional removal.
A perfect optical flat produces a pattern of straight, evenly spaced
lines. In faceting, the lines will always be curved since no two laps
are exactly the same trueness of surface.The object here is to center
"Newton's Rings" and avoid mis-alignment of facet and lap. There seems
to be no question that scratches tend to develop beneath that portion of
the facet that is not flat to the lap surface. Additional information is
contained in the the complete article:U.S.F.G. Newsletter,Vol9 No.3,Sept
l999 by this author,or email:

vloakhl@webtv.net
Vincent Bishop, O.D.

_______________________________________________________________

Message:14

Subject: RE: re-cutting
Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2002 17:12:30 -0500
To: <faceters@caprock-spur.com>
From: "bruce greenleaf" <bggems@gwi.net>

In response to a post sent by "Rockey"....

When I recut a stone to get rid of windows, I simply dop the stone on
the table, in a transfer jig so I can use an appropriate dop to align
the stone. For example, use a cone dop to center a round, square, or
even a rectangle. Of course use wax or epoxy only on the crown side.
After that, I recut the pavillion, using corect angles, just as I was
starting from scratch.
If there isn't enough 'meat' left, then obviously, I simply recut the entire stone.
Any way that you can get the proper angles on to a pavillion will at
least get rid of your windows, even if you don't align your pavillion
facets with the crown facets.
Well hope this very "non-technical" advice helps you out!

++ Bruce Greenleaf, Starks, Maine

_______________________________________________________________

Message:15

Subject: BIO :
Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2002 17:24:44 -0500
To: <faceters@caprock-spur.com>
From: "bruce greenleaf" <bggems@gwi.net>

Hello all,

I have been "lurking" for quite a while now..
And, as a lot of other folks out there, I have more time to read, than
write!
Anyway I have been faceting 'comercially' for over 12 years now, and
have been 'concave' faceting for about three or so.
Never-ending fun with stones! I have even incorporated lapidary with my
hobby of Ham Radio, I have been grinding quartz crystals to use as the
frequency-determining component for transmitter circuits.
I mostly facet for jewelers etc. but do occasionally facet just for
fun.... I felt a bit bored with 'flat faceting' so I picked up a 'OMF
Faceting machine' to experiment with concave faceting. It is really
something what you can do with the optical effects caused by throwing a
curve or two into a stone!
OK enough for now!
Have fun, stay safe!
Bruce Greenleaf... .Maine


====================================
RESOURCES FOR LAPIDARIES ~

Hale Sweeny's Lapidary Digest Archives http://www.lapidarydigest.com/
ILA Lapidary Arts Digest Online http://facetersdigest.org/toady.htm


RESOURCES FOR FACETER'S ~

Facetron: http://www.facetron.com/
Graves: http://www.rockhounds.com/graves/
MDR: http://www.mdr-facet.com/
Polymetric: http://www.polymetricinc.com/
Ultra-tec: http://www.ultratec-facet.com
Fac-Ette Manufacturing Company: (910)256-9248
http://www.fac-ette.com/ 800-336-9248.
Raytech Industries: http://www.raytech-ind.com
Rock Peddler: 1-800-416-4348 / www.rockpeddler.com

====================================

RESOURCES FOR GEMOLOGISTS ~

Accredited Gemologists Association, http://aga.polygon.net/
American Gem Society, (AGS) 702-255-6500
American Gem Trade Association, (AGTA) http://www.agta.org
Gemmological Assc. & GTL / Great Britain, http://www.gagtl.ac.uk/gagtl
Gemmological Association of Australia, http://www.gem.org.au
Gemological Institute of America, (GIA) http://www.gia.edu.giagem
International Gem Society (IGS) web site is: http://www.gemsociety.org
International Colored Gemstone Association, http://www.gemstone.org

====================================

FACETING GUILDS (Alphabetically, World) ~

*Charleston Faceting Guild, South Carolina, wmcnay@mindspring.com.
*Columbia-Willamette Faceter's Guild, http://www.facetersguild.com/
*Danish Faceters Guild, http://medlem.spray.se/danfacet/
*East/Central Florida:Tomoka Gem and Mineral Society's Faceters Guild,
Don Cameron: ghgemcutter@earthlink.net
*Eastern Mass Faceter's Group, rockpeddler@attbi.com
*Faceter's Forum Society-LaPorte, IN VESteele@aol.com
*Faceter's Guild of N. California, Wayne Meissner, lklomp@cnetech.com
*Faceter's Guild of S. California, Jerry W. Carroll, (818)348-6327
*Intermountain Faceter's Guild, Carl M. Unruh, (360)385-3753
*Midwest Faceter's Guild, E-mail: tgibbs@compuserve.com
*Mid-Williamette Faceters Guild, Albany, Oregon, Michael E. Bumcrot;
E-mail @ MBumcrot@valleyoilco.com
*Moreton Bay is a branch of the Australian Facetors' Guild, Brisbane,
Queensland. http://cwpp.slq.qld.gov.au/afg
*New Mexico Faceter's Guild, Nancy Attaway, attaway@highfiber.com
http://www.attawaygems.com/NMFG
*North Puget Sound Faceting Guild, Keith Wyman, tfw@fidalgo.net
*Tacoma Faceting Guild, Chuck Bloch chuck_b@prodigy.net
*Texas Faceter's Guild, Jill Rowlands, gemsbyj@aol.com
*Seattle Faceting Club (LeonardBahr@prodigy.net)
*United States Faceting Guild (Keith Wyman, tfw@fidalgo.net)
http://www.usfacetersguild.org/events.shtml
*Vancouver Island Faceters' Guild - British Columbia, Canada.
wrheitland@shaw.ca

(Add your faceting organization here, US or International - Write to
( owner-lapidary@caprock-spur.com or owner-faceters@caprock-spur.com )

====================================

TODAY'S FUNNY ~

Greeting cards are getting expensive, so why not design your very
own Hallmark Moment with some these sayings:

"I've always wanted to have someone to hold, someone to love.
After having met you, I've changed my mind."

"I must admit, you brought religion into my life.
I never believed in Hell till I met you."

"Looking back over the years that we've been together, I can't help
but wonder: What the heck was I thinking?"

"If I get only one thing for Christmas, I hope it's your sister."

"As you grow older, Mum, I think of all the gifts you've given me.
Like the need for therapy..."

"Thanks for being a part of my life! I never new what evil was before this!"

"Money is tight, times are hard, here's your @#$/& Christmas card!!!"

"Congratulations on your promotion. Before you go, I would like you to
take this knife out of my back. You'll probably need it again."

"Sorry things didn't work out, but I can't handle guys with breasts that are
bigger than mine."

"When we were together, you always said you'd die for me.
Now that we've broken up, I think it's time you kept your promise."

"The holidays are a great time to be with family. Of course, your family
won't be with you, since I'm taking the kids and moving in with my sister,
you cheating *%&*@#!"

=====================================

REFLECTIONS AND TIDBITS:

" Most people give up what they want out of life
Because they give in to the moment."

--- Author Unknown ---

=====================================
BUSINESS SECTION:

No messages today

=====================================
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS:

Facet polishing laps
Still have a couple of dozen Vargas Pol-A-Gem laps left. Only Cerium Oxide
in 6" size. There will be no more 8". Glenn really is not interested in
fiddling with his lathe to correct his maching problems at 8". He and his
protoge, Dick Rugel, will make more 6" if there is demand. There is nothing
faster,better or more durable than a Pol-A-Gem for quartz,sunstone, opal etc.
One lap should last a lifetime ....and they DO NOT SCRATCH. They also work
great on 8" machines. Lemme know your interest. Price delivered in US is
$63.85.
Jerry Newman Gemart Services gemartserv@aol.com

11072002
********

Subject: FS- Tourmaline Rough
Date: Wed, 6 Nov 2002 21:35:00 EST
To: faceters@caprock-spur.com
From: Elpaninaro@aol.com

Evening everyone,

Thanks to all again for your many thoughtful comments here and in private
email to date. I am definitely gonna go Facetron now :)

Sorry to make a commercial post so new to the group, but as I told a member
in an email exchange we have been having, last week I went to storage and did
some digging whereupon I found a nice stash of tourmaline rough I did not
know I had! It would take me years to cut all of this so...

I have decided the best way to help finance buying a faceting machine is to
sell some of this material and wanted to offer it here. I do not have a carat
scale on hand, so would like to see what interest level there is and then I
can weigh pieces at a local jeweler or something and send pics over the
weekend to interested parties.

Most of this material is 2 carats to 3 grams in weight by my estimation and
any flaws will be reported. Here is what I had in mind price-wise,

Indicolite- clean crystal sections with good blue a/b and electric blue open
c-axis- first rate material in my limited experience, $20 per gram
Indicolite- one two gram crystal with deep blue color and closed c, $15 per
gram
Indicolite- clean crystal sections with greenish color and or closed c-axis,
$10 per gram
Rubellite- clean hot pink c-axis pieces, one with yellow ab axis, $15 per
gram
Green- a few pieces, one verdelite and two borderline chromites with wild
blue hues, $15 per gram
Paraiba- one outstanding crystal section tourmaline with a very vibrant blue
green color, probably 1.5 grams or so and flawless it is in natural state and
a near preform for a pear with good recovery, $35 per gram.
A few other odds and ends too- mostly Rhodolite

Just to make it clear too, all items are first come first served and I am
happy to take returns with no questions asked. Just looking to raise some
faceting machine money and if you do not like the rough you can send it right
on back for a refund.

Thanks everyone!

Tom.


11072002
********


Subject: AD
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 20:50:44 -0800
To: faceters@caprock-spur.com
From: "P. Miklik" <b-daw@pacbell.net>

AVAILABLE FOR SALE
Contact b-daw@pacbell.net

ZIRCONS
Honey, red & brown zircons, 10g parcels @$20/parcel

GARNETS
Red Garnet $8/g, eye clean-slightly included
Spessartine Garnet $7.50/g, slight-moderately included
Malaya Garnet $6/g, good eye clean roughs
Tunduri Garnet $10/g, eye clean-slightly included

TOURMALINES
Pink Tourmaline $20/g, eye clean-slightly included
Red Tourmaline $10/g, slight-moderately included
Bicolor Tourmaline $15/g, eye clean
Watermelon Tourmaline $20/g eye clean
Green/Green Blue Tourmaline $10/g, eye clean roughs

SAPPHIRES
Blue, Green & Blue/Green Sapphires $35/g, eye clean-slightly
included, up to 1g.

BERYL
Blue Beryl (Aquamarine) $6/g, eye clean-slightly included crystals
Green Beryl (Emerald) $10-$50/g, eye clean-slightly included crystals,
zoned green
Cabbing Grade Aquamarine $3/g

10312002
********

Must sell the following rough - no reasonable offer refused -

Rose Malaya Garnet - deep red, eye clean african material - 1 kg available -
$2.00/gram for quantities of 500 grams or more

Red Zircon - eye clean african material - 300g available - $2.00/gram if you
take the entire 300 grams

Spessartite Orange Garnet - slightly to moderately included African
material - Ranges from 1.5 - 3 cts size - $7.50 per gram if you take the
entire 300 grams

I have put pictures of the rough and stones cut from it on the web -
check it out at: http://www.wintershill.com/rough

You can email me (Richard) for more info or ?'s at: wntrhill@somtel.com

*******
Rock Peddler
Complete online discount catalog for cabbing and faceting machines, wheels,
laps, polishes, diamond saws, diamond blades, and general lapidary supplies
at http://www.rockpeddler.com.

09272002P
********

Gewelers Gems
e-mail: sales@jewelersgems.com
Solid copper laps 1/4 thick 8" and 6" you can charge both sides with
diamond. http://www.jewelersgems.com/faceting_laps.htm

03222002P
********

RRGaetan GEM BROKERS < "Quality gem rough for discriminating gem-cutters."
We serve hand-select (and bulk/parcels, too!), affordable, quality gem rough
in a variety of materials. Our most recent arrivals: Aug. 2 ­ Aquamarine,
Spessartite and Tourmaline. For details and a colorful, interactive e-flyer
(PDF), email rrgaetan@san.rr.com and ask for "The Rough List."

00000000P
*****

===================================

COMPETITIONS:

For All National and International Masters, Past-Masters and
World-Class Cutters:

This post is simply a reminder that in 2003 the USFG will host its
first National and International Faceting Competition. It is called
the North American Faceting Challenge -- 'NAFC.' Since the designs
and rules were first published in the 2001 September Issue of the
USFG's Newsletter, and since they have not been published since 2001,
some of you, who are most capable - skill-wise, may not
know about the competition, and some of you may have forgotten. The
"NAFC" is an OPEN Competition. Please note: The designs and rules
can be downloaded at <http://www.usfacetersguild.org/events.shtml>.
The closing date is June 20th, 2003; the amount of time between the
present date and June 20th, 2003 should be enough for all Master
cutters to cut the two required designs -- Fred Van Sant's "Four
Star," and Charles Covill's "Wind Wheel No. 2." If further
information is needed, please contact me at <clmoon@pacbell.net>.

Charlie Moon


===================================

SHOWDATES:

~ FLORIDA

Just a reminder that the St. Lucie Rock & Gem Club will be hosting their 25th
annual show at the Ft. Pierce Civic Center (25th St. & Virginia Ave.), on
November 9th & 10th. Saturday 10-6, and Sunday 10 - 5.
I'll be demonstrating both days.
Norm Holbert
Port St. Lucie, FL

*****

Canaveral Mineral & Gem Society is again presenting
our yearly gem show, the Parade of Gems, November 23rd and 24th at the
Melbourne auditorium, 625 E Hibiscus Blvd in Melbourne, FL, from 10AM to
6PM. Admission is $3, with kids under 12 admitted free.

*****

Tomoka Gem and Mineral Society's annual show will be held on Dec. 14 and 15 at
the Volusia County Fairgrounds, located on state route 44 in Deland, Florida.
Fairgrounds are 1 mile east of interstate route 4 at exit 118. We will have at
least one showcase of faceted gems done by our members. Thank you, John Withey


*****

~ CALIFORNIA


FACETERS SYMPOSIUM 2003
Presented by the Faceter's Guild of Southern California
At the Seaside GEMboree AFMS/CFMS Convention & Show
Ventura, California June 6-7-8, 2003


You are invited to participate in the Faceters
Symposium 2003 which will be held at the Seaside Park
(Ventura Fairgrounds) at Ventura, California during the
AFMS/CFMS Convention & Show. The Faceters Symposium dates
are June 6th, 7th, & 8th. That is Friday, Saturday, &
Sunday. The CFMS GEMboree is on those dates as well as on
Thursday the 5th of June. All of this is at the same
location, just a hundred yards from the beach.

The Faceters Symposium will feature ten speakers, who
will have presentations covering various parts of gemstone
faceting interests. A Hospitality Hour on Friday evening
and a Saturday Awards Luncheon are also part of the
Symposium. There will be competitions at the Novice,
Advanced, & Masters levels. Get started on your
competition entry soon.

The CFMS GEMboree itself will have buildings that have
exhibits on display, dealers with their wares to offer,
demonstrators to show how it is done, and speakers with
presentations covering other lapidary fields of interest.

For information & costs regarding the Faceters
Symposium (including competition information), your contact
is listed below. Ask for one of the Packets. Be sure to
state your snail mailing address so that a Packet can be
mailed to you.

Glenn Klein, Chairman
24001 Muirlands Blvd., Space #79
Lake Forest, CA 92630 email: glennklein@yahoo.com

===================================


LAPIDARY ARTS and FACETERS DIGEST PERSONALS:


KANSAS: If anyone in the central portion of the country from Oklahoma city
to Wichita to Kansas City would be interested in forming something like the
Flatland Facet Guild or some such name give me a line at
faceter@bigfoot.com
Larry W. Davis
******

ILLINOIS - MISSOURI (Central Area, hubed around St. Louis, Missouri) A
group of 4 faceters have met and we had a great time. We intend to meet
again and would like to have fellow faceters join our group. I received an
email from another Newbie that expressed interest in attending our next get
together. Faceters from any and all areas are welcome... It's swell to meet
personally and exchange tips and hints! COME JOIN OUR GROUP! It's FREE! ;o)
Doug Smith, Alton, IL .at: gembin@spiff.net
******

INDIANA: I moved to Valparaiso, (Northwest) Indiana, about three years ago.
Are there any clubs in this area? or is there anyone interested in starting
one? I do faceting and some cabbing. Not much here but cornfields. Nice
scenery, but I get sooooooo lonely. LOL Let me know. (Bill) "William
J.Pysnack" <wjpin@home.com>
******

S.E. LOUISIANA: Anyone in or around the New Orleans, LA area wishing to
form a club or have get togethers for faceting, discussions, cabbing,
procurement, etc. Please contact me via email @ tbird@bayouself.org. (Thom
Bird - Chalmette, LA)
*****

MISSISSIPPI: If anyone is near Meridian Mississippi and would be interested
in forming some kind of club or just get together with faceting and/or
cabbing please e-mail me at jennings@netdoor.com Thanks, Jim
*****

TEXAS: Anyone in the Corpus Christi or Coastal Bend area that is interested
in starting a local faceter's guild contact me at: hankswan@earthlink.net or
gemscc@msn.com or telephone 361-857-2405 (days) or 361-992-1296
(evenings).Hank swan
******

WASHINGTON DC.(Rockville Md area) Looking for folks to get together
occasionally to facet. I have just started faceting and am also interested
in sphere making (infinate # of facets) Robert Winfield
winfielr@inra.nimh.nih.gov
******

=============================================
Lurking is fine, but participation is more fun!! Get involved!!
=============================================

LAPIDARY ARTS and FACETERS DIGEST Staff ~

Thurmond Moore III/ Moderator
owner-faceters@caprock-spur.com

Fred Ward / Moderator - Gemology
fward@erols.com.

Tempie Francis, Attorney at Law / Legal Advisor

==============================================
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