====================================
LAPIDARY ARTS and FACETERS DIGEST

committed to carrying on the fine works started
by Hale Sweeny and Jerry Dewbre
====================================
Issue No.15 - Monday November 25, 2002
====================================
Click a link below to post to the list:
for faceting questions faceters@caprock-spur.com
for lapidary questions lapidary@caprock-spur.com
====================================
List Posting Guidelines and rules can be found at:
http://www.gemcutters.org/rules.htm
====================================
Web Site http://www.gemcutters.org
Archives: http://www.gemcutters.org/archives.htm
====================================
Published Monday thru Friday, except holidays
from Spur,Texas
====================================
The Lapidary Arts Digest is moderated by:
Thurmond Moore III & Fred Ward (Gemology)
====================================
====================================
Index to Today's Digest

Lapidary Messages:
--------------
01 Re: Moisture removal
02 Tarnish free silver alloy?

Faceting Messages:
--------------
03 Re: Photographing gemstones?
04 Faceters Symposium 2003 Update

Business Section - No messages today.
====================================
LAPIDARY DISCUSSION:


Message:01

Subject: Re: Issue No.13 - Thursday November 21, 2002
Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2002 16:14:44 EST
To: faceters@caprock-spur.com
From: Lapadary@aol.com

> those moisture removing packets that you sometimes see in vitamin and
> prescription bottles, etc., except use a much larger size packet.....And
> perhaps I'll figure out some other dehumidifying products to place inside
> the saw along with your 25 watt light bulb idea......

There are containers of 'stuff' made for motor homes called "DrizAire" or
somethint similar. Check your nearest RV supply house.


_______________________________________________________________
Message:02

Subject: question
Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2002 13:45:41 -0700
To: <faceters@caprock-spur.com>
From: "jake" <efjke@msn.com>

Dear Sir;

I have a question. Perhaps someone can help. I wrote the IGS and they put
this to the readers, re. "I would like to know about the following mentioned
on your web site, if details are available:

"Some South American silversmith's use an 80% alloy that does not tarnish."

Mr. Clark wrote me back and said that he thought that the trick was the use
of nickel, and that perhaps a reader was familiar with this. As for the use
of nickel I am afraid that this may very well be the case, which rules out
its use for any of my close relatives as they have a metal allergy. Far more
common than many suspect. Which is why a local station aired a program on
"white gold problems." Most is made with a nickel alloy, but sometimes (not
often) palladium is used for white gold, which avoids the problem. However
is that is the case not all is lost as I have no metal allergies, and would
seriously consider this (for myself) if it is not some kind of nightmare to
alloy for casting. I am interested in any reply from anyone who may have
used this, but have the feeling that there is a down side because it has not
come into common use.

E. Jakeman


_______________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________
FACETING DISCUSSION:

Message:03

Subject: Photographing gemstones
Date: Fri, 22 Nov 2002 18:17:49 -0500
To: faceters@caprock-spur.com
From: Fred Ward <fward@erols.com>

Rudy asked about the best conditions for photographing gemstones....

(Because I spent 28 years writing and photographing National Geographic's gemstone series
and many other topics and because I have nine books on gemstones in print, I think I might
be able to handle this question.)

There are many approaches to this question. Because I've written on this subject a number
of times, I'd suggest you check the archives for "photographing" or "photography."

To begin, one can learn the basics and get good usable photographs without too much time
or difficulty. Or one can aim to be an expert (or an artist) and spend a lifetime
perfecting techniques.

Let me tell you some of the easy ways. You can refine them as you like.

For most people it's much easier today with digital cameras than with film. Almost all
current digitals have auto focus, auto exposure, macro capability, white balance, accurate
viewing on an LCD screen, and the ability to stop down the lens for maximum depth of
field.

Film cameras will make higher quality images, but are often a bit more difficult for more
people to operate because there are not as many automatic features as with digitals.

Lighting.... you may want to advance to a studio environment with multiple lights, but
that's not the place to start. Master available light first and then move on to lights if
you like. Look at my GEM CARE book. This year's revision was almost entirely done with a
Nikon 990 digital camera.... and the color printing is superb. That's amazing enough to
me, but all the new pictures were made with available light at gem shows! That is
astounding. Only by having "white balance" built in to the new digitals makes this
possible.

So, to begin:

Read the manual and understand how to set the camera's "white balance." Then master your
camera's macro focusing. Get a good little tripod. Get some smooth colored paper to use as
your background. Get in a windless open shade spot (window, porch, patio, etc.) set up
your gem and look at it closely and carefully. Can you see the look you want to capture.
You want to see the gem's color and facets without seeing unattractive highlights or
reflections. If you close one eye and concentrate on the gemstone until you get the look
you want, then set up your camera to capture that look from the same position. Get in
close enough to fill your frame with gem and not background. Prop up your gem and
background paper on a book if you need it closer to your lens.

I know this is a simple approach to gem photography. I also know it works 90% of the time.
Use the smallest f/stop you have. Keep the camera steady. Take pictures from a variety of
angles.

If you want to move to lighting you can use reflectors, direct lighting, translucent
domes, or anything you think makes attractive pictures. The key to all this is to keep
experimenting. Take lots of pictures. See what you like and don't like about the results.
Then do it differently next time.

Let us all know about your progress.

Fred Ward GG
Gem Book Publishers


_______________________________________________________________
Message:04


Subject: Faceters Symposium 2003 Update
Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2002 11:45:01 -0800 (PST)
To: LAPIDARY ARTS FACETERS DIGEST <faceters@caprock-spur.com>
From: Glenn Klein <glennklein@yahoo.com>

Hi All:

Things are progressing nicely for the upcoming Faceters
Symposium 2003 in Ventura CA next June.

My Staff and I have decided to lower the number of speaker
presentations to Nine (from the Ten announced earlier).
This is because we have plans for so much happening over
the three days of June 6,7,& 8 that we are having a time
working it all in.

Besides the nine speaker presentations, we will have a
Hospitality Hour for easy faceter mingling on Friday
evening, then the Awards Luncheon on Saturday noon, and in
addition to all that, we are planning for two special
guests, who will not be giving speaker presentations, but
they will be present during the Symposium and will be part
of our Panel of Experts on Sunday. The Panel will answer
faceting questions from the attendees, and discuss faceting
subjects as the interests of the attendees dictate. This
Panel idea was a great success at the last Symposium in
2000 at Riverside, CA.

One of our special guests will be Fred Van Sant. I am sure
there are lots of you faceters out there who would like to
meet and talk face to face with Fred. His cut designs have
become so well known over the past twenty-five
years...plus. Our other special guest has not yet
confirmed his ability to be present. The same thing
happened with two of our speaker presenters...they could
not commit their time so far ahead. If all were to say yes
today, I would have a problem of working the presenters
space back up to Ten.

All in all, it is going to be one heck of a great Faceters
Symposium, unequaled anywhere before. Be sure to ask for
one of our packets of information, if you would like to
learn more about the Facilities, Competition, etc. Just
email me below, and be sure to give me your mailing address
so that I can get a packet out to you.

Glenn Klein, Chairman glennklein@yahoo.com
Faceters Symposium 2003
November 24, 2002

====================================
RESOURCES FOR LAPIDARIES ~

Hale Sweeny's Lapidary Digest Archives http://www.lapidarydigest.com/
International Lapidary Association http://www.gemcutters.org


RESOURCES FOR FACETER'S ~

Facetron: http://www.facetron.com/
Graves: http://www.rockhounds.com/graves/
MDR: http://www.mdr-facet.com/
Polymetric: http://www.polymetricinc.com/
Ultra-tec: http://www.ultratec-facet.com
Fac-Ette Manufacturing Company: (910)256-9248
http://www.fac-ette.com/ 800-336-9248.
Raytech Industries: http://www.raytech-ind.com
Rock Peddler: 1-800-416-4348 / www.rockpeddler.com

====================================

RESOURCES FOR GEMOLOGISTS ~

Accredited Gemologists Association, http://aga.polygon.net/
American Gem Society, (AGS) 702-255-6500
American Gem Trade Association, (AGTA) http://www.agta.org
Gemmological Assc. & GTL / Great Britain, http://www.gagtl.ac.uk/gagtl
Gemmological Association of Australia, http://www.gem.org.au
Gemological Institute of America, (GIA) http://www.gia.edu.giagem
International Gem Society (IGS) web site is: http://www.gemsociety.org
International Colored Gemstone Association, http://www.gemstone.org

====================================

FACETING GUILDS (Alphabetically, World) ~

*Charleston Faceting Guild, South Carolina, wmcnay@mindspring.com.
*Columbia-Willamette Faceter's Guild, http://www.facetersguild.com/
*Danish Faceters Guild, http://medlem.spray.se/danfacet/
*East/Central Florida:Tomoka Gem and Mineral Society's Faceters Guild,
Don Cameron: ghgemcutter@earthlink.net
*Eastern Mass Faceter's Group, rockpeddler@attbi.com
*Faceter's Forum Society-LaPorte, IN VESteele@aol.com
*Faceter's Guild of N. California, Wayne Meissner, lklomp@cnetech.com
*Faceter's Guild of S. California, Jerry W. Carroll, (818)348-6327
*Intermountain Faceter's Guild, Carl M. Unruh, (360)385-3753
*Midwest Faceter's Guild, E-mail: tgibbs@compuserve.com
*Mid-Williamette Faceters Guild, Albany, Oregon, Michael E. Bumcrot;
E-mail @ MBumcrot@valleyoilco.com
*Moreton Bay is a branch of the Australian Facetors' Guild, Brisbane,
Queensland. http://cwpp.slq.qld.gov.au/afg
*New Mexico Faceter's Guild, Nancy Attaway, attaway@highfiber.com
http://www.attawaygems.com/NMFG
*North Puget Sound Faceting Guild, Keith Wyman, tfw@fidalgo.net
*Tacoma Faceting Guild, Chuck Bloch chuck_b@prodigy.net
*Texas Faceter's Guild, Jill Rowlands, gemsbyj@aol.com
*Seattle Faceting Club (LeonardBahr@prodigy.net)
*United States Faceting Guild (Keith Wyman, tfw@fidalgo.net)
http://www.usfacetersguild.org/events.shtml
*Vancouver Island Faceters' Guild - British Columbia, Canada.
wrheitland@shaw.ca

(Add your faceting organization here, US or International - Write to
( owner-lapidary@caprock-spur.com or owner-faceters@caprock-spur.com )

====================================

TODAY'S FUNNY ~

This man sees a sign in front of a house "Talking Dog Free to Good
Home."

He rings the bell and the owner tells him the dog is in the back yard.
The man goes into the back yard and sees a mutt sitting there.

"You talk?" he asks.

"Yep," the mutt replies.

"So, what's your story?"

The mutt looks up and says "Well, I discovered this gift pretty young
and I wanted to help the government, so I told the CIA about my gift,
and in no time they had me jetting from country to country, sitting in
rooms with spies and world leader, cause no one figured a dog would be
eavesdropping. I was one of their most valuable spies eight years
running.

The jetting around really tired me out, and I knew I wasn't getting any

younger and I wanted to settle down. So I signed up for a job at the
airport to do some undercover security work, mostly wandering near
suspicious characters and listening in. I uncovered some incredible
dealings there and was awarded a batch of medals.

Had a wife, a mess of puppies, and now I'm just retired."

The man is floored... but says to the owner, "This dog is amazing.,

incredible.....

Why on earth are you giving him away?"

The owner replies, "He's such a liar."


=====================================

REFLECTIONS AND TIDBITS:

Here are some facts about the 1500s:

Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in
May and still smelled pretty good by June. However, they were starting
to smell so brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor.

Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the
house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons
and men, then the women and finally the children-last of all the babies. By then
the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it-hence the saying,
"Don't throw the baby out with the bath water."

Houses had thatched roofs -- thick straw -- piled high, with no wood
underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the
dogs, cats and other small animals (mice, bugs) lived in the roof. When it
rained it became slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the
roof -- hence the saying "It's raining cats and dogs."

There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house. This posed
a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could really
mess up your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung
over the top afforded some protection. That's how canopy beds came into
existence.

The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt,
hence the saying "dirt poor." The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery
in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh (straw) on the floor to help
keep their footing. As the winter wore on, they kept adding more thresh until
when you opened the door it would all start slipping outside. A piece of wood
was placed in the entranceway -- hence, a "thresh hold."

In those old days, they cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that
always hung over the fire. Every day they lit the fire and added things to the
pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat. They would eat the
stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight and then
start over the next day. Sometimes the stew had food in it that had been there
for quite a while -- hence the rhyme, "peas porridge hot, peas porridge
cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old."

Sometimes they could obtain pork, which made them feel quite special.
When visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show off. It was a
sign of wealth that a man "could bring home the bacon." They would cut off a
little to share with guests and would all sit around and "chew the fat."

Those with money had plates made of pewter. Food with a high acid
content caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning
and death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400 years
or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous.

Most people did not have pewter plates, but had trenchers, a piece of
wood with the middle scooped out like a bowl. Often trenchers were made
from stale bread which was so old and hard that they could be used for quite
some time. Trenchers were never washed and a lot of times worms and mold got
into the wood and old bread. After eating off wormy, moldy trenchers, one
would get "trench mouth."

Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of
the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or "uppercrust."

Lead cups were used to drink ale or whiskey. The combination would
sometimes knock them out for a couple of days. Someone walking along the road
would take them for dead and prepare them for burial. They were laid out on
the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather around
and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up -- hence the custom of
holding a "wake."

England is old and small and the local folks started running out of
places to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to a
"bone-house" and reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, 1 out of
25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized
they had been burying people alive. So they thought they would tie a string
on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the
ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all
night, the "graveyard shift", to listen for the bell; thus, someone could be
"saved by the bell" or was considered a "dead ringer."

And that's the truth...

and whoever said that History was boring?!

=====================================
BUSINESS SECTION:
=====================================
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS:


Subject: AD
Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 16:44:27 -0500
To: faceters@caprock-spur.com
From: Bob Collins <nichesw@comcast.net>

CZ - Final Sale

Hi Cutters,

I expect this to be my final update to this ad...

As I said, I am not a rough dealer... just a cutter like you.

Recently I had the opportunity to buy a mixed lot of Russian CZ... as it

turned out, it was MUCH more CZ than I would ever cut!!!
So I sold some of it to others.

Well, I got seduced again!!! I was able to get some of the nicer, more
exotic colors... (couldn't resist!) so, I once again have much too much
just for me.

Once this is gone... THERE WILL BE NO MORE FROM ME!!!
....AND, I'm going to cut prices and beat all competition that I am aware
of...
Good opportunity to stock up!

I have it in the following colors / sizes:

Dark Violet - Amethyst (avg. 160 cts)
Lavender 50 - 85cts (avg. 70)
Champagne 100 - 520cts (avg. 165)
Red 50 - 592cts (avg. 75)
Red/Brown (Cognac?) 100 - 366cts (avg. 120)
Orange (Padpradscha?) 10 - 65cts. (avg. 25) SUPER!
Peridot (Apple?) Green 25 - 120cts. (avg. 35)
Light Pink 20 - 700cts (avg. 35)
Medium Pink - all about 35cts.
Yellow - light 25 - 45cts. (avg. 35)
Yellow - medium - all about 35cts.
Yellow - dark 15 - 50cts. (avg. 35)

All the above at a FINAL price of $0.04/ct. (avg. retail = $0.08 to
$0.10)

Now the "Exotics"!!!

Green - shades vary from a lighter green with a touch of yellow to a
deeper green. 35 - 100 cts. (avg. 70)

Light Blue - looks a lot like mid-grade blue topaz in color. Avg. about
18cts.

Blue(s) - Medium blue to Teal color. Avg. about 150cts.

Electric Blue - WILD!!! 40 - 250cts. (avg. 100)

The Green/Blue are more expensive... $0.18/ct. (Avg. retail = about
$0.25)

Let me know what size(s) you require and I will do my best to meet your
needs.
$25 min. order, please.

Postage and insurance (at my cost) will be extra.

GemBob
nichesw@comcast.net
http://www.qualitygemcutting.com/gpbobc.htm

11192002
********

Rough to Cut
If you're looking for quality facet rough please check out Rough to Cut,
http://www.roughtocut.com. We offer a wide range of quality facet rough
from Aquamarine to Zircon. Large selections in stock currently of Beryl,
Garnets & Tourmalines. Please check us out & when you do, why not give a
try to our contest, you could win a 5ct + piece of Spessartite garnet
facet rough.

Noel
Rough to Cut
http:www.roughtocut.com

11142002P
********

Facet polishing laps
Still have a couple of dozen Vargas Pol-A-Gem laps left. Only Cerium Oxide
in 6" size. There will be no more 8". Glenn really is not interested in
fiddling with his lathe to correct his maching problems at 8". He and his
protoge, Dick Rugel, will make more 6" if there is demand. There is nothing
faster,better or more durable than a Pol-A-Gem for quartz,sunstone, opal etc.
One lap should last a lifetime ....and they DO NOT SCRATCH. They also work
great on 8" machines. Lemme know your interest. Price delivered in US is
$63.85.
Jerry Newman Gemart Services gemartserv@aol.com

11072002
********

Subject: AD
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 20:50:44 -0800
To: faceters@caprock-spur.com
From: "P. Miklik" <b-daw@pacbell.net>

AVAILABLE FOR SALE
Contact b-daw@pacbell.net

ZIRCONS
Honey, red & brown zircons, 10g parcels @$20/parcel

GARNETS
Red Garnet $8/g, eye clean-slightly included
Spessartine Garnet $7.50/g, slight-moderately included
Malaya Garnet $6/g, good eye clean roughs
Tunduri Garnet $10/g, eye clean-slightly included

TOURMALINES
Pink Tourmaline $20/g, eye clean-slightly included
Red Tourmaline $10/g, slight-moderately included
Bicolor Tourmaline $15/g, eye clean
Watermelon Tourmaline $20/g eye clean
Green/Green Blue Tourmaline $10/g, eye clean roughs

SAPPHIRES
Blue, Green & Blue/Green Sapphires $35/g, eye clean-slightly
included, up to 1g.

BERYL
Blue Beryl (Aquamarine) $6/g, eye clean-slightly included crystals
Green Beryl (Emerald) $10-$50/g, eye clean-slightly included crystals,
zoned green
Cabbing Grade Aquamarine $3/g

11012002
********

Must sell the following rough - no reasonable offer refused -

Rose Malaya Garnet - deep red, eye clean african material - 1 kg available -
$2.00/gram for quantities of 500 grams or more

Red Zircon - eye clean african material - 300g available - $2.00/gram if you
take the entire 300 grams

Spessartite Orange Garnet - slightly to moderately included African
material - Ranges from 1.5 - 3 cts size - $7.50 per gram if you take the
entire 300 grams

I have put pictures of the rough and stones cut from it on the web -
check it out at: http://www.wintershill.com/rough

You can email me (Richard) for more info or ?'s at: wntrhill@somtel.com

*******
Rock Peddler
Complete online discount catalog for cabbing and faceting machines, wheels,
laps, polishes, diamond saws, diamond blades, and general lapidary supplies
at http://www.rockpeddler.com.

09272002P
********

Gewelers Gems
e-mail: sales@jewelersgems.com
Solid copper laps 1/4 thick 8" and 6" you can charge both sides with
diamond. http://www.jewelersgems.com/faceting_laps.htm

03222002P
********

NOW ONLINE! RRGaetan Gem Rough ­ Featuring excellent, facet-grade,
Colombian Emerald rough! PLUS, Chrome Tourmaline, Achroite Tourmaline,
Golden Chrome Tourmaline, Aquamarine, Spess, Mint and Malaya Garnets,
and more! For photos and more information, visit us at rrgaetan.com.

11242002RP
********

===================================

COMPETITIONS:

For All National and International Masters, Past-Masters and
World-Class Cutters:

This post is simply a reminder that in 2003 the USFG will host its
first National and International Faceting Competition. It is called
the North American Faceting Challenge -- 'NAFC.' Since the designs
and rules were first published in the 2001 September Issue of the
USFG's Newsletter, and since they have not been published since 2001,
some of you, who are most capable - skill-wise, may not
know about the competition, and some of you may have forgotten. The
"NAFC" is an OPEN Competition. Please note: The designs and rules
can be downloaded at <http://www.usfacetersguild.org/events.shtml>.
The closing date is June 20th, 2003; the amount of time between the
present date and June 20th, 2003 should be enough for all Master
cutters to cut the two required designs -- Fred Van Sant's "Four
Star," and Charles Covill's "Wind Wheel No. 2." If further
information is needed, please contact me at <clmoon@pacbell.net>.

Charlie Moon

*****

Subject: First USFG faceting list design competition.
Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 16:29:21 -0800
To: faceters@caprock-spur.com
From: Dan Clayton <dclayton@speakeasy.org>

First USFG faceting list design competition.

Design: Hexagon or Hexagon Cushion in Colorless or Colored Topaz

Judging: Highest number for total ISO values at 0, 10, 20,30, 40
and 50 degree tilt with five degree head shadow in GemFramx will
win. Example parameters are given below to achieve this configuration.
Online designs must be submitted by January 10, 2003. Design and
cut entries should have the design posted by that date but stone judging
will take place at the OPLC Hobnob in Tucson in February 2003.

Publication: All entries will be posted on the USFG faceting list site
and possibly on the USFG site as well. Designs may be included in
a USFG list CD. Designers maintain copyright to their designs but
must allow posting on the USFG faceting list site. Posting or publishing
elsewhere is not only permitted but encouraged.

Followup: Additional contests may be held for other shapes and
materials if there is sufficient interest and participation.

RI 1.61
head shadow 5 degrees
ignore glare no (default)
tilt movie yes (default)
starting tilt direction 0
ending tilt direction 5 (default)
maximum tilt angle 50
tilt increment 10
suppress VGA no (default)
concave no (default)
COS files no (default)
ISO files no ( you can enter yes if you wish
but it will fill your disk )
DISP files no (default)
exit files no (default)
starting file # increment each run if you wish to save images

Values for ISO will be summed and used as ISO total.
ISO Total will be deciding factor in judging but there will be 30
points deducted for a missed meetpoint. Fractional

Special recognition will be given to most original design as determined
by team of four judges selected by Jeff Ford or delegate/s.

Classes:

Individual,
all work must be done by one individual. In the
case of a fractional indices or an incomplete design a design
coach will explain how the problem can be fixed and the
entry will be moved to Coached class.

Team/Coached,
more than one individual from a club, guild or area may work together
as a team. If an individual wishes coaching they may do so but most
work must be done by the entrant with only suggestions by coach. This
means Fred Van Sant or some other designer can not do a design that you
enter as your own. I encourage friends, club/guild members to enter as a
team. Do not hesitate to enter if you need some coaching. We have design
mentors who are happy to help you.

Modified,
for a public domain design or a copyrighted design that the copyright holder
gives you permission to use. You enter design with modified angles, new tiers
or deleted tiers which gives "optimum" performance as determined by ISO
total. We will post at least two very basic designs you can enhance as you
please.

Design and Cut,
design will be posted and ISO Total noted but beauty of the finished stone
will be the judging criteria. Stones will be judged at the OPLC Hobnob in
Tucson. Individual, Team/Coached and Modified designs will be judged
separately.


I hope this format will encourage design and optimization oldtimers and
newcomers to get involved and hopefully develop their skills. All
entries will be posted on the site and may drive some traffic and interest.
I think ISO Total is as good as any single value to evaluate design
performance but we will look to improve criteria in the future.


Dan Clayton


===================================

SHOWDATES:

~ FLORIDA


Canaveral Mineral & Gem Society is again presenting
our yearly gem show, the Parade of Gems, November 23rd and 24th at the
Melbourne auditorium, 625 E Hibiscus Blvd in Melbourne, FL, from 10AM to
6PM. Admission is $3, with kids under 12 admitted free.

*****

Tomoka Gem and Mineral Society's annual show will be held on Dec. 14 and 15 at
the Volusia County Fairgrounds, located on state route 44 in Deland, Florida.
Fairgrounds are 1 mile east of interstate route 4 at exit 118. We will have at
least one showcase of faceted gems done by our members. Thank you, John Withey


*****

~ CALIFORNIA


FACETERS SYMPOSIUM 2003
Presented by the Faceter's Guild of Southern California
At the Seaside GEMboree AFMS/CFMS Convention & Show
Ventura, California June 6-7-8, 2003


You are invited to participate in the Faceters
Symposium 2003 which will be held at the Seaside Park
(Ventura Fairgrounds) at Ventura, California during the
AFMS/CFMS Convention & Show. The Faceters Symposium dates
are June 6th, 7th, & 8th. That is Friday, Saturday, &
Sunday. The CFMS GEMboree is on those dates as well as on
Thursday the 5th of June. All of this is at the same
location, just a hundred yards from the beach.

The Faceters Symposium will feature ten speakers, who
will have presentations covering various parts of gemstone
faceting interests. A Hospitality Hour on Friday evening
and a Saturday Awards Luncheon are also part of the
Symposium. There will be competitions at the Novice,
Advanced, & Masters levels. Get started on your
competition entry soon.

The CFMS GEMboree itself will have buildings that have
exhibits on display, dealers with their wares to offer,
demonstrators to show how it is done, and speakers with
presentations covering other lapidary fields of interest.

For information & costs regarding the Faceters
Symposium (including competition information), your contact
is listed below. Ask for one of the Packets. Be sure to
state your snail mailing address so that a Packet can be
mailed to you.

Glenn Klein, Chairman
24001 Muirlands Blvd., Space #79
Lake Forest, CA 92630 email: glennklein@yahoo.com


~TENNESSEE

The Middle Tennessee Gem & Mineral Society, Inc. announces their
22nd annual "Earth Treasures" Jewelry, Gem, Mineral and Fossil Show.
There will be door prizes, auctions, exhibits, demonstrations and 30
dealers from around the US.

The MTG&MS is a not-for-profit educational society, made up of local
members from around Middle Tennessee, interested in the study, collection
and understanding of minerals, the earth's geological history, jewelry
making, and the polishing of gem stones. The profit from this annual
show and sale go to fund nine (9) scholarships at regional universities,
along with two Tennessee Elementary Schooll Earth Science projects
and two middle Tennessee Senior Citizens workshop programs.

Date: December 14-15, 2002

Time: 9 AM-6 PM Saturday & 10 AM-5 PM Sunday

Place: Creative Arts Building, Tennessee State Fairgrounds, Nashville, Tennessee

Admission: $2.00 Adults, $0.50 High School Students, Under 12 free with an adult

Contact: Will Smith (615) 366-1022 Show Chairperson

Web Site: www.mtgms.org Email: willsmith.2@comcastnet

Exhibits: Show cases of Fossils, Minerals, Jewelry, cut and polished gemstones

Including local Elmwood minerals from the zinc mines at Carthage and beautiful
Tennessee Paint Rock Agate from the mountains of Middle Tennessee

Demonstrations: Silversmithing, beading, wire wrapping, flint knapping and faceting

Other activities: Hourly door prizes and silent auctions

Dealers will offer:

Gold and silver jewelry, mountings and repair

Colored gem stones & diamonds, loose or mounted in jewelry

Crystals and minerals from around the world including our local-world renowned
golden calcites from Carthage

Fossils and artifacts including dinosaur life, marine life and prehistoric arrowheads,
along with modern flint knapping

Tools and supplies for the above

Feel free to call if you have any questions. We appreciate your help and support.


~VIRGINIA

Roanoke Valley Mineral & Gem Society - 22nd Annual Show at the
Salem Civic Center, Salem, VA 11/29-12/1/02. Thanks,Larry White

===================================


LAPIDARY ARTS and FACETERS DIGEST PERSONALS:


KANSAS: If anyone in the central portion of the country from Oklahoma city
to Wichita to Kansas City would be interested in forming something like the
Flatland Facet Guild or some such name give me a line at
faceter@bigfoot.com
Larry W. Davis
******

ILLINOIS - MISSOURI (Central Area, hubed around St. Louis, Missouri) A
group of 4 faceters have met and we had a great time. We intend to meet
again and would like to have fellow faceters join our group. I received an
email from another Newbie that expressed interest in attending our next get
together. Faceters from any and all areas are welcome... It's swell to meet
personally and exchange tips and hints! COME JOIN OUR GROUP! It's FREE! ;o)
Doug Smith, Alton, IL .at: gembin@spiff.net
******

INDIANA: I moved to Valparaiso, (Northwest) Indiana, about three years ago.
Are there any clubs in this area? or is there anyone interested in starting
one? I do faceting and some cabbing. Not much here but cornfields. Nice
scenery, but I get sooooooo lonely. LOL Let me know. (Bill) "William
J.Pysnack" <wjpin@home.com>
******

S.E. LOUISIANA: Anyone in or around the New Orleans, LA area wishing to
form a club or have get togethers for faceting, discussions, cabbing,
procurement, etc. Please contact me via email @ tbird@bayouself.org. (Thom
Bird - Chalmette, LA)
*****

MISSISSIPPI: If anyone is near Meridian Mississippi and would be interested
in forming some kind of club or just get together with faceting and/or
cabbing please e-mail me at jennings@netdoor.com Thanks, Jim
*****

TEXAS: Anyone in the Corpus Christi or Coastal Bend area that is interested
in starting a local faceter's guild contact me at: hankswan@earthlink.net or
gemscc@msn.com or telephone 361-857-2405 (days) or 361-992-1296
(evenings).Hank swan
******

WASHINGTON DC.(Rockville Md area) Looking for folks to get together
occasionally to facet. I have just started faceting and am also interested
in sphere making (infinate # of facets) Robert Winfield
winfielr@inra.nimh.nih.gov
******

=============================================
Lurking is fine, but participation is more fun!! Get involved!!
=============================================

LAPIDARY ARTS and FACETERS DIGEST Staff ~

Thurmond Moore III/ Moderator
owner-faceters@caprock-spur.com

Fred Ward / Moderator - Gemology
fward@erols.com.

Tempie Francis, Attorney at Law / Legal Advisor

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